8/3/10 at Camden Yards

This was one of the most fun/hectic days I’ve ever experienced at a major league stadium.

For starters, it was a Watch With Zack game; my client was a 23-year-old from Indiana named Justin. We were joined by Phil Taylor, a senior writer for Sports Illustrated, who’s working on a big story about ballhawking. And that’s not all. There was also a two-person film crew following my every move and getting footage for a separate documentary about collectors. (I blogged about the filmmakers two months ago when they first interviewed me.)

See what I mean?

Fun. And hectic.

Let me point out that Justin didn’t mind the media being there. In fact, he was looking forward to getting a behind-the-scenes look at how it would all go down. He had booked this game a month in advance, so when the media contacted me and asked if they could tag along with me at a game, I ran it by Justin first to make sure it was okay. If he had said no, then I would’ve picked a different game to do the interviews.

Anyway, let’s get to the first photo of the day. It shows some friends, acquaintances, and “key players” outside the gate:

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From left to right, you’re looking at:

1) Phil Taylor from Sports Illustrated.

2) Me!

3) Justin, my Watch With Zack client.

4) An aspiring ballhawk named Andrew. He and I have now run into each other three times since last season, all at different stadiums.

5) Avi Miller (check out those orange socks) who writes an outstanding Orioles blog.

6) Rick Gold, a fellow ballhawk, who began the day with 937 lifetime balls.

7) My good friend Ben Hill, who writes a blog about minor league baseball’s wackiest promotions. He lives in NYC and traveled to Baltimore with me for the day. He’s gone to several games with me in the past, including this one three years ago in Philly.

I saw some other familiar faces outside the gate and made a couple new friends during the hour that we were all standing around. By the time the stadium opened, there were a ton of people. Everyone was really friendly, we had a lot of laughs, and I remember thinking, “Phil picked a good day to join me.” I mean…most of the people I see/meet at games are friendly, but it just felt like love was in the air a bit more than usual. During the five hours that Phil spent with me, several fans asked for my autograph, one guy asked to have his six-year-old son’s picture taken with me, and two female ushers greeted me with hugs. Bottom line: ballhawking has gotten some bad press in recent seasons, so I’m hopeful that Phil got a positive impression of it based on our time together.

Five minutes before the stadium opened, the filmmakers showed up. I didn’t take a photo of them at that point because I was distracted. I was being interviewed by Phil, and I was giving Justin a few pointers, and I was focused on being the first one in so I could try to beat everyone else to the left field seats. Moments after I got there, I took the following photo:

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Justin, wearing the orange Orioles shirt that he’d received on the way in, was already in position 13 rows back. Rick, wearing the black shirt, was walking through my row.

BP was dead at the start. An usher had already combed through the seats to pick up the loose baseballs, and the Orioles weren’t hitting many home runs. It’s too bad there wasn’t more action because the media was officially on the scene:


That’s Paul with the big camera and Meredith with the smaller one (and of course that’s Phil from Sports Illustrated sitting between them).

After ten minutes or so, I raced one full section to my left and snagged a home run ball that landed in the seats, and on the very next pitch, I sprinted back to my original spot and caught a homer on the fly. That felt good. I was on the board. I’d even used a bit of athleticism. Phil had gotten a good view. Paul and Meredith had gotten good footage.

What about Justin, you ask?

Two days earlier, when I had spoken to him on the phone, he told me that he wanted ME to break double digits. He also told me that he didn’t want any of the balls that I caught, and that he mainly wanted to learn by watching me in action. But still, he wanted to snag some baseballs on his own, and I did my best to help him.

Unfortunately, the Orioles stopped hitting at 5:16pm — roughly 15 minutes ahead of schedule — so that took a major chunk of opportunities away from us. It did, however, give us a chance to wander into foul territory and focus on getting balls from the Angels.

Justin threw on a maroon Angels T-shirt and headed to the corner spot near the 3rd base camera well:

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When the Angels started throwing, Justin moved down the foul line into shallow left field, and as a result, I happened to get the next two balls. Mike Napoli tossed me one. The other was a random overthrow that skipped off the rubberized warning track and bounced into the empty front row.

Paul and Meredith followed me everywhere and kept the cameras rolling:

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I helped Justin pick the best possible spot along the foul line…

6_justin_angels_throwing.JPG

…and played a role in getting Jered Weaver to toss him a ball. This was only the third ball that he’d ever snagged at a major league game, and it was the first one that had been given to him by a player.

Moments later, another errant throw bounced off the warning track and ended up in the seats, this time ten rows back, so I scampered up the steps and grabbed it.

The Angels had started hitting by that point, and I noticed that a ball had rolled onto the warning track in straight-away left field. I hurried over, used my glove trick to reel it in, and immediately handed the ball to the smallest kid with a glove.

That was my sixth ball of the day, and I got Scott Kazmir to throw me No. 7 in left-center. I was about eight rows back when I got his attention. He lobbed it perfectly, right over everyone and into my glove. (After batting practice, I gave that ball away, too.)

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That’s when things slowed way down. The stands got really crowded, and I ran into some bad luck. For example, I was standing in one spot for about ten minutes, and there was NO action there. Eventually, I ran down to the front row to chase a ball that ended up falling short, and while I was there, Howie Kendrick hit a home run that landed right where I’d been. But hey, that’s just how it goes. I realize that I’d gotten lucky earlier with the two overthrows that bounced near me in the seats.

Justin was in a good spot, or at least a spot that’s normally good, but the balls just weren’t flying our way, and the Angels abruptly stopped hitting at 6:08pm. The visiting team’s batting practice normally goes until 6:20-ish, so that sucked. On the plus side, though, the shortened session of BP gave us extra time to eat and talk to Phil. (Justin got interviewed, too.) Paul and Meredith suggested eating at one of the tables near the concession stand. That certainly would have been easier because they had to deal with their equipment in addition to their food and beverages, but I insisted on heading back to the seats — and it’s a good thing. Halfway through the meal/interview, I noticed that Orlando Mercado and Mike Napoli were getting close to finishing playing catch down the left field line.

“Run over there,” I told Justin with a mouthful of pepperoni pizza. “You’ll probably get that ball, but you have to hurry.”

He looked over in the direction where I was pointing, shrugged, and took another bite of his chicken strips.

“Fine,” I said, “I’ll go over there.”

I threw my pizza back in the box, wiped my hand on my shirt, grabbed my glove…and returned 90 seconds later with the ball. Mercado, thankfully, had been the one who ended up with it. I’m pretty sure that Napoli would’ve recognized me and thrown it to someone else.

Shortly before game time, I got Torii Hunter’s autograph on my ticket:

8_torii_hunter_autograph.jpg

(I tried to get him to use my blue Sharpie, but he was moving quickly with his own black marker.)

Justin and Phil and I spent most of the game in the standing-room-only section in right field:

9_justin_phil_taylor_flag_court.JPG

There were lots of lefties in the lineup, so it was a good spot, but of course there wasn’t any action. The closest we came was when Luke Scott blasted a home run to right-center field, which, according to Hit Tracker, traveled 447 feet. The ball cleared the seats and landed in the narrow walkway at the very back of the section. I ran in that direction from the standing room…

10_luke_scott_home_run_screen_shot.jpg

…but got trapped behind a couple other fans approximately 15 feet from the spot where it landed.

Paul and Meredith had already taken off by that point, and Phil left soon after. He felt like he’d gotten enough info/material, and he told me he’d get in touch if he had any follow-up questions. His article, by the way, will either run this season as the pennant races are heating up or it’ll run next spring in the “baseball preview” issue. Phil told me that he had interviewed some other ballhawks (he wouldn’t say who) and that they all told him that he had to talk to me. (That was nice to hear.) I mentioned a lot of names to him, so there’s really no telling who else he’ll end up interviewing.

Anyway, late in the game, Justin and I went for foul balls. This was our view for several left-handed batters:

11_justin_going_for_foul_balls.JPG

Then, in the top of the ninth, I helped him sneak down to the umpires’ tunnel behind the plate. He took the right side of the tunnel, and I hung back a few rows on the left. In the following photo, the red arrow is pointing to him:

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After the final out, home plate ump Jerry Layne placed a ball in Justin’s glove…

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…and then he handed me a ball, too, just before he disappeared.

That was it. Justin doubled his lifetime total by snagging two baseballs, and I finished with nine — not terrible considering that the teams skipped half an hour’s worth of batting practice.

Final score: Orioles 6, Angels 3. (Nice debut for Buck Showalter as the Birds’ new skipper.)

In case you were wondering, my friend Ben Hill was nowhere near me during the game. He met up with his own friend, and they sat together behind the Orioles’ dugout. Ben has finally achieved full-time status at MLBAM (Major League Baseball Advanced Media), so he now has a pass that gets him into any non-sold-out major league game for free, and once he’s inside, he can sit wherever he wants. Pretty cool, huh? If only he had more free time to take advantage.

Ben took one final photo of me and Justin after the game:

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Justin and I then said our goodbyes. Ben and I then made the three-hour drive back to New York City.

SNAGGING STATS:

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• 9 balls at this game (7 pictured on the right because I gave two away)

• 211 balls in 23 games this season = 9.2 balls per game.

• 652 consecutive games with at least one ball

• 199 consecutive games outside of New York with at least one ball

• 24 consecutive Watch With Zack games with at least two balls (click here to see all the stats and records from my Watch With Zack games)

• 4,569 total balls

CHARITY STATS:

• 45 donors (click here to learn more)

• $6.49 pledged per ball (if you add up all the pledges)

• $58.41 raised at this game

• $1,369.39 raised this season for Pitch In For Baseball

13 Comments

Nice job Zack! Do people stare a lot at you when you have cameramen after you?
P.S I just saw Heath, you can read about it on my blog:
http://bloggingandballhawking.mlblogs.com

Are you still doing your stats where you do how many baseballs you snag vs. the score of the game?

Very nice on SI! Do you know if the piece will be a Point After on the last page or a full blown feature article?

Zack – great snagging for the press as you got a ball every way except a game ball hit, foul, or toss up. You are getting this hobby too much press and soon everyone will be doing it! :)

You mentioned the SI article, but what is going to be done with the video? You should do a few other games and have someone video you in action as well. Video would be a great addition to your blogs. Which, by the way, are always an excellent read. Looking forward to your book next season.

Keep on writing.

Ken

FatherPuck keeps coming up Go Isles. Have I been hacked?

Zack, what did you do with the giveaway Orioles t-shirt? Because I wanted to know if it was up for sale.

hey zack, on the topic of the O’s i ever tell you that some of Nick Markakis’s family lives a few doors away from me? Hes a great guy and hooked me up with a ball a few months ago at YS.

M_KEMP_27-
Yeah, people stare, but I’m usually so focused on the camera (and on the players) that I don’t really notice. Also…cool entry about Heath Bell. I’m always glad to hear that he’s being friendly.

MARYPOLITAN-
I’ve been lazy about it, but I’ll try to bring that stat back soon. Thanks for asking.

GOISLES-
I was told that it’ll be a big feature article.

KEN-
Thanks so much, but which video are you asking about? Do you mean the documentary that I was filmed for at this game? That’ll hopefully end up in theaters and/or on DVD next year. As for filming little videos to complement my blog entries, that’s something that I would love to do, but I really can’t do it alone. My friend Brandon is a videographer, and we’ve talked about it, so maybe we’ll finally get around to it next season. The only problem is that he lives in California, so it takes quite an effort for us to end up at the same stadium at the same time.

LJWX87-
I gave the T-shirt to a friend.

LI7039-
Very cool. I’m a big Markakis fan. I think he’s seriously underrated.

Zack-

Friday I went to my first MLB Game outside of Spring Training (second ever) in Toronto. The Rays were playing the Blue Jays (I’ve been a long distance Rays fan for years) I followed your advice and showed up when the gates opened wearing my Rays cap, jersey, and T-shirt. I went straight down the foul line and- wouldn’t you know it- there was hoards of autograph and ball seekers there. After standing there for a while, Lance Cormier threw a BP ball in the general direction of the people. It hit the wall, and I saw it just sitting there. I called the security guard on the field and asked if she could hand it to me, and she did (i’m 14, saying i’m from Alaska and this is my first game can get people to do some pretty cool stuff). My question to you is; Does the ball count if a security guard gives it to you? If it doesn’t count towards a streak, i’m not disappointed. A BP ball and a James Shields autograph on my Rays jersey is a pretty good first game, right?

I just noticed your ticket was a comp–NICE! I love it when I get free tickets to games! Did SI set that up?
~Matt
http://bloggingboutbaseball.mlblogs.com/

AJ IN AK-
Congrats on a great first game, and I think the ball from the security guard definitely counts. I never count balls that other fans try to give me, but whenever a stadium employee gives me one, it’s all good.

MATT-
You’re very observant, but actually, SI had nothing to do with the ticket. I got it from a friend who had extras.

Very cool, Zack! Way to go! Looking forward to reading the article when it arrives in my mailbox. What a cool milestone for you!
http://torontoblogjays.mlblogs.com/

Thanks! If you’re still looking for the article, you can check it out here on my web site:

http://www.zackhample.com/baseball_collection/media/sports_illustrated2.htm

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